Canadian Centre for Economic Analysis

Recent Publications and Bulletins

Population and Job Growth Planning: Socioeconomic Issues with Places to Grow

Robust population and job projections go hand-in-hand with a holistic understanding of the health of economy, structural changes, infrastructure policy, and economic development, especially given their interconnections. Indeed, the need to connect population and job projections to the changing times is more imperative now than ever before. This is particularly the case in view of the recent decade of precarious employment, stagnant wage growth, and debt to which household finances are exposed in a climate of growing global competition and productivity pressures.

Missing Infrastructure's Crucial Returns - A Critique of FAO's Hydro One Report

Amidst the attention surrounding the Financial Accountability Officer’s report on Hydro One (October 2015), too few commentators have focused on the significant and important gap in the FAO’s selective analysis that results from omitting the taxation revenue impacts of investing part of the Hydro One share sale proceeds in much-needed Ontario infrastructure.

Costs, Benefits and Risks of Growth: Region of Peel: An exercise in regional socio-economic risk management

Between 2014 and 2041, the Region of Peel's population is expected to grow by 41%, the number of employed residents of Peel expected to grow by 35%, while jobs in Peel are at risk of growing only 23%. If Peel plans and services growth according to Places to Grow expectations, overcapitalization on employment lands may leave Peel with over $2 billion in stranded debt.

Socio-Economic Analysis: Value of Toronto Community Housing’s 10-Year Capital Investment Plan and Revitalization

Toronto Community Housing Corporation (TCHC), situated in the heart of one of the largest cities in North America, manages a stock of approximately 59,700 dwellings that provide homes to roughly 109,000 individuals. TCHC houses diverse families and individuals with a range of affordability levels, from those that pay market-level rents to others that qualify to pay rent that is geared according to family income. As of 2015, a $750M backlog of repairs threatens the ability of the second largest landlord in North America to continue meet its mandate of providing clean, affordable, and well-maintained homes.

Ontario Infrastructure Investment: Federal and Provincial Risks and Rewards

Analysis demonstrates that if sharing of the Ontario public infrastructure funding risks were to follow from the fiscal benefits that accrue to different levels of government, then all Ontario-based governments would be expected to cover approximately 61 per cent of the investments, with the federal government covering the balance of 39 per cent. Yet currently, all the Ontario-based governments collectively cover 88 per cent of the infrastructure investment risk.

Economic Evaluation of Region of Peel Water/Wastewater Investment

Sufficient investment into the Region of Peel (RoP) infrastructure ensures that the region’s roads, waste management, transit systems as well as water and power delivery are properly maintained and are adequate to serve the growing needs of the population of the region and the province. Beyond the basic societal needs, this investment also plays an important economic role in the way it supports the means of production and transportation of the region’s goods and services.

Public Infrastructure Investment in Ontario: The Importance of Staying the Course

The Ontario government recently announced a 10-year infrastructure plan entitled Building Together. It promises to build upon the long-term approach to infrastructure investment from the previous ReNew Ontario plan. As a result, the awareness of infrastructure investment in Ontario has increased. However, while the public has an intuitive understanding of the importance of infrastructure to the economic prosperity of the province, it is likely that the majority of the population does not fully recognize the personal risks associated with continued underinvestment.

Public Infrastructure Underinvestment: The Risk to Canada's Economic Growth

For some time, experts have been warning of a deficit between the current state of Canadian infrastructure and what is required—the so-called “infrastructure gap.” And, while it is well known that the quality and quantity of infrastructure has a direct impact upon how efficiently societies are able to operate and grow, individuals and businesses have yet to connect underinvestment in infrastructure to their personal prosperity. Citing a municipal infrastructure deficit in the billions of dollars sounds staggering, but it may not resonate on a personal level with the public.

Diagnostic transitions from childhood to adolescence to early adulthood

Background:
Quantifying diagnostic transitions across development is needed to estimate the long-term burden of mental illness. This study estimated patterns of diagnostic transitions from childhood to adolescence and from adolescence to early adulthood.

Synthesis through simulation: insights on the epidemiology of mood and anxiety disorders in Canada

Objective:
Prevalence estimates for mood and anxiety disorders in Canada are available, but various methodological approaches have produced inconsistent results. Simulation studies involve careful examination of available data by an expert modelling team working together with subject matter experts. Simulation can integrate datasets and literature-based estimates from various sources into a coherent mathematical representation of the underlying total population epidemiology.

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